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Our Chicago non-compete agreement attorneys have defended high level executives in covenant not to compete and trade secret lawsuits. A case in which our firm defended a former Motorola executive was covered in Crain’s Chicago business. You can view that article by clicking here.

DiTommaso-Lubin a firm of Chicago business dispute lawyers handles litigation over non-compete clauses for individuals and businesses of all sizes, including small or closely held businesses for whom competition from an ex-employee can be a serious threat. Our Chicago business lawyers with offices near Oak Lawn, Arlington Heights, Oak Brook and Chicago have substantial experience in restrictive covenant and breach of contract cases, and we are proud of our record of strong results. We have successfully represented a number of doctors in non-compete, partnership and other business disputes.  We understand the complexities of physician partnership and non-compete agreements.

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Although various people and organizations can put together estimates of the number of sexual assaults that take place in a given time frame, it is extremely difficult to come up with an accurate number. Because so many incidents go unreported, it is common for different sources to come up with wildly different estimates and it’s nearly impossible to tell whose estimates are more accurate.

According to a recent lawsuit filed against Baylor University, more than three dozen football players for the university committed at least 52 rapes in a four-year period.

These numbers are much higher than Baylor’s version of events, which currently recognizes 19 players involved in 17 reports of alleged physical attacks since 2011.

The most recent lawsuit, filed by a plaintiff whose name is only give as “Elizabeth Doe,” is just one of at least five such lawsuits filed against the university by women who were allegedly attacked and who claim the school did nothing to protect them or respond to their complaints. Continue reading

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The National Law Review contains a very helpful article on new developments in Illinois non-compete agreement law.  It discusses the requirement to work two years before a non-compete agreement can become enforceable if no other consideration or payment has been provided to enter into the non-compete agreement other than continued employment. The article states in part:

For those who find themselves embroiled in disputes involving non-compete and non-solicitation clauses, cases are often decided on the fundamentals of contract law. Any valid and enforceable contract requires three things. First, there must be an offer manifesting an intent to enter into a contract. Second, that offer must be accepted. Third, the element of consideration requires the parties to incur a detriment—to either do something they are not legally obligated to do or to refrain from doing something they otherwise could.

It is this third element of a contract that is often glossed over by businesses, lawyers, and sometimes even judges. In most contract disputes, Illinois courts do not inquire as to the adequacy of consideration, confirming only that some consideration exists and ending the examination there. But in non-compete cases, consideration can take center stage. Though this area of law is unsettled in Illinois, some measure of predictability as to how a court will assess consideration can be gained by looking at recent key decisions.

Fifield v. Premier Dealer Servs., 2013 IL App (1st) 120327, a 2013 case out of the Illinois First District Court of Appeals, pops up in numerous subsequent court decisions, and therefore warrants a close look. In it, an employee signed a contract preventing him from soliciting any of his employer’s customers or competing with his employer for business for a period of two years following his departure from the company, provided that his departure was not due to his own resignation. Three months later he resigned and went to work for a competitor. He and his new employer argued that the non-solicitation and non-competition provisions were unenforceable because there was not adequate consideration.

You can review the entire article by clicking here. Continue reading

Published on:

Our Chicago non-compete agreement attorneys have defended high level executives in covenant not to compete and trade secret lawsuits. A case in which our firm defended a former Motorola executive was covered in Crain’s Chicago business. You can view that article by clicking here.

DiTommaso-Lubin a firm of Chicago business dispute lawyers handles litigation over non-compete clauses for individuals and businesses of all sizes, including small or closely held businesses for whom competition from an ex-employee can be a serious threat. Our Chicago business lawyers with offices near Oak Lawn, Arlington Heights, Oak Brook and Chicago have substantial experience in restrictive covenant and breach of contract cases, and we are proud of our record of strong results. We have successfully represented a number of doctors in non-compete, partnership and other business disputes.  We understand the complexities of physician partnership and non-compete agreements.

Published on:

Our Chicago non-compete agreement attorneys have defended high level executives in covenant not to compete and trade secret lawsuits. A case in which our firm defended a former Motorola executive was covered in Crain’s Chicago business. You can view that article by clicking here.

DiTommaso-Lubin a firm of Chicago business dispute lawyers handles litigation over non-compete clauses for individuals and businesses of all sizes, including small or closely held businesses for whom competition from an ex-employee can be a serious threat. Our Chicago business lawyers with offices near Oak Lawn, Arlington Heights, Oak Brook and Chicago have substantial experience in restrictive covenant and breach of contract cases, and we are proud of our record of strong results. We have successfully represented a number of doctors in non-compete, partnership and other business disputes.  We understand the complexities of physician partnership and non-compete agreements.

Published on:

Our Chicago non-compete agreement attorneys have defended high level executives in covenant not to compete and trade secret lawsuits. A case in which our firm defended a former Motorola executive was covered in Crain’s Chicago business. You can view that article by clicking here.

DiTommaso-Lubin a firm of Chicago business dispute lawyers handles litigation over non-compete clauses for individuals and businesses of all sizes, including small or closely held businesses for whom competition from an ex-employee can be a serious threat. Our Chicago business lawyers with offices near Oak Lawn, Arlington Heights, Oak Brook and Chicago have substantial experience in restrictive covenant and breach of contract cases, and we are proud of our record of strong results. We have successfully represented a number of doctors in non-compete, partnership and other business disputes.  We understand the complexities of physician partnership and non-compete agreements.

Published on:

Our Chicago non-compete agreement attorneys have defended high level executives in covenant not to compete and trade secret lawsuits. A case in which our firm defended a former Motorola executive was covered in Crain’s Chicago business. You can view that article by clicking here.

DiTommaso-Lubin a firm of Chicago business dispute lawyers handles litigation over non-compete clauses for individuals and businesses of all sizes, including small or closely held businesses for whom competition from an ex-employee can be a serious threat. Our Chicago business lawyers with offices near Oak Lawn, Arlington Heights, Oak Brook and Chicago have substantial experience in restrictive covenant and breach of contract cases, and we are proud of our record of strong results. We have successfully represented a number of doctors in non-compete, partnership and other business disputes.  We understand the complexities of physician partnership and non-compete agreements.

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Trump won his campaign on a platform that promoted him as a hard-hitting businessman who doesn’t back down until he gets what he wants. That worked for about half the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed against Trump National Jupiter Golf Club, but the other half still want their money back.

When Trump bought the struggling golf club from Marriott Vacations Worldwide in 2012, he paid the relatively low price of $5 million, but there was a catch. As part of the agreement, Trump had to take on $50 million in debt. The club had a refund policy regarding a deposit members paid when they purchased their membership. But when members wanted out of the club, it couldn’t afford to refund all their deposits.

Rather than pay up, as agreed, Trump did what he does best: he allegedly played hardball. He allegedly told the members they could cancel their membership, after which they would no longer be allowed to use the club’s facilities, but they would have to continue paying their membership dues to the club. They were also allegedly told they would not receive their refunds until new members had been found to replace them, which could potentially take years to accomplish. Continue reading

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Vincent L. DiTommaso, Peter S. Lubin, Patrick D. Austermuehle, and Andrew C. Murphy recognized by Illinois Super Lawyers 

Vincent L. DiTommaso and Peter S. Lubin have been selected as 2017 Illinois Super Lawyers in the areas of Business Litigation and Class Action Law. No more than 5% of attorneys in Illinois receive this honor each year. This marks the sixth straight year both co-founders of DiTommaso-Lubin have been selected for this honor.

Two additional DiTommaso-Lubin attorneys, partner Patrick D. Austermuehle and senior associate Andrew C. Murphy, have been selected as Illinois Rising Stars for the third straight year in the areas of Business Litigation and Class Action Law. Rising Stars are selected from attorneys under the age of 40 who have been practicing for less than 10 years. No more than 2.5% of Illinois attorneys are selected by the research team at Super Lawyers to receivet his honor each year.

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Most of us don’t think of A-list movie stars as having trouble paying for anything they want, but even when you’re making millions, it’s possible to spend more than you make. It can happen to the best, either through irresponsibility or mismanagement.

Because the extremely wealthy usually hire people to manage their money for them, everyone tends to start pointing fingers when things go wrong and it’s usually up to the courts to determine who was ultimately at fault.

According to The Management Group (TMG), Johnny Depp, the 53-year-old Oscar nominee and their former client, has been spending $2 million a month and allegedly still owes them $4.2 million for a loan they gave him. The unpaid loan allegedly forced them to start foreclosure proceedings on properties owned by the celebrity.

TMG claims it has been doing everything in its power to curb Depp’s outrageous spending habits for the better part of two decades. But the actor allegedly failed to respond appropriately, blamed his business managers, and continued to overspend. Continue reading